Storm Storyteller: A Q&A with New York Times’ Bestselling Author Kim Cross

  The day I spoke with Alabama author Kim Cross, it was on the one-year anniversary of her first book being published. The Alabama native and contributing editor with Southern

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Talking Story with Flight of Dreams Author on the Anniversary of the Hindenburg Disaster

On May 6, 1937 the German passenger airship the Hindenburg disintegrated in a fiery crash in Lakehurst, New Jersey. The disaster killed 36 passengers and 61 crewmen, and became the stuff of legend

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The Writing Well celebrates storytelling in all its forms, and I am thrilled  to post a unique blog  with some of the social media “storytellers” invited by NASA to observe

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Today, The Writing Well turns from horror and zombie apocalypse writing to the polar opposite genre of Christian romance writing set against the backdrop of the American Civil War. We examine

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I recently asked prolific historical fiction author Pam Jenoff how she does it all.  The Cambridge-trained historian, law professor and mother of three has written eight books beginning with her

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Tracy Groot, a Michigan native, found out early she loved to write.  But it’s the topics she’s tackled that make her so intriguing:  faith and finding your moral center against

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As an organizational storyteller and a history buff, I’ve seldom tackled a more fascinating writing assignment than this: chronicling Wharton Executive Education’s program that brings lessons of leadership from actual

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After a long hiatus I am delighted to feature author Robert Hicks on The Writing Well. Writing about history – especially the Civil War – takes more than just an

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  Behind the Governor’s Palace, home of the Virginia colony’s royal and post colonial governors. This weekend my family and I returned from a fun-filled week in Colonial Williamsburg and

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  Mathew Brady portrait of Rev. C.T. Quintard sometime between 1855 and 1865.            “If it be true that — ‘They also serve, who only stand and wait,’ surely they serve

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